Sunday, December 13, 2009

The Tiniest Chateau in the World?

Those little paper dollhouses I posted a while ago made me remember the most challenging project I've ever done in paper. I found this paper chateau online last year and couldn't resist trying my hand! However the graphics were a bit blocky so I decided to scale it down a little, so that everything would look better. Somehow, the palm sized model I was going to make shrank quite a bit...
The picture above shows the chateau in progress, before I'd started the dormers or chimneys.
Here it is with all but the right-most chimney. See how crooked the chimneys are? Next time I try something like this, I'll just use scraps of wood or styrene. The chimneys were the hardest part, far harder than the dormers. I had to print out many copies, because I kept squashing the chimneys and yes, dropping dormer parts.

I normally prefer to design my own really tiny paper houses, because I can make allowances for the thickness of the paper. However, considering that this was intended to be built much larger, it had surprisingly few problem areas. There were only four really tricky folds in the wall construction, and then those dratted chimneys!
It's been sitting on my crafting table for the last year, high up where I can see it, but it can't come to harm. Lately I've been thinking about doing something else with it, either adding it to a mini scene, or using it to make a Christmas ornament, but I can't decide. Does anyone else have an idea?

7 comments:

  1. Amazing, just amazing!!!!

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  2. No way, that's impossible!! You are awesome to be able to do that!! Thanks for visiting my blog :)

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  3. Thank you, both of you. For some reason, I find paper folding this size ALMOST relaxing :)

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  4. No word suits other than amazing! Love it! Maybe you could make a scene inside of a clear ball Christmas ornament? Add landscaping, snow and a sleigh with reindeer on the front lawn.

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  6. It is a absolute wonder, I love it!

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  7. It is the type of object one would find in a gentleman's library. The gentleman being one who toured Europe and collected models of buildings.

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